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Hooked is a fish shop run by chefs. We sell 100% sustainably sourced fish and shellfish.


Locations

Leslieville

Store Hours

Parking

Transit

Queen Streetcars 501, 503


Products

416 828 1861
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Wild Nunavut

Arctic Char

Friday July 25th!


 


Near Cambridge Bay Nunavut, Inuit fisherman capture the char as they have for centuries. With a mixture of small gill nets and weir nets, which are similar to underwater fences, they wade into the rivers to trap the fish. At the water’s edge, the fish are immediately cleaned and loaded several times a day onto float planes that haul the day’s catch to the processing plant. The char provides important income in this remote area with few economic opportunities, and its success outside the region allows the local people to stay in their arctic home and pursue a traditional way of life.>>>

 

Ruth Reichl at Edulis Restaurant: “They fed us wonderful food. Herring, in a big pot, with onions, carrots and a salad of tiny fingerling potatoes...The most extraordinary wild Nunavut Arctic char – a revelation to me, who has never had anything but farmed char before. So delicate. So delicious. We ate in a kind of dream …”

>>>  We have been after this fish since we opened – we have been unsuccessful with the Nunatsaivut fish due to very difficult first 100km logistics (there are no roads, and it is too warm for snowmobiles). However, last year we teamed up with a San Fransisco based restaurant supplier and flew fish in through Yellowknife.  We can’t wait to do it again – these are possibly the most incredible fish we ever see.


There are two parts to each season: The “spring” run, typically three weeks in July, begins after the ice breaks when the fish journey out to sea from the freshwater lakes where they spend the winter living under the ice. The “fall” run, typically another three to four weeks at the end of August and stretching into September, starts when “summer” temperatures dip and the fish swim back to their winter home after feeding in the Northwest Passage.